NY Times article on new art facilities on elite campuses

At our last meeting, Michael mentioned Iowa State’s new art building, which reminded me of this recent article in the NY Times. Although it’s primarily about private elite universities, the same sort of PR effort is happening at state public universities, like ISU.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/16/arts/design/on-elite-campuses-an-arts-race.html?module=Search&mabReward=relbias%3Ar%2C%7B%221%22%3A%22RI%3A6%22%7D&_r=0

“Such faith in the arts is not confined to Harvard. Elite campuses across the country have emerged from the recession riding a multibillion-dollar wave of architecturally ambitious arts facilities, even as community arts programs struggle against public indifference. The current tide of building developed over years, as universities reassert the essential value of the arts to a well-rounded education, aided by deep-pocket alumni willing to underwrite elaborate new facilities “for noble and not always so noble reasons,” Mr. Lentz said.”

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PER CHRIS W.: INTERESTING ASU EXPERIMENT

Hi Everyone,

One thing I mentioned in the last meeting was the ASU experiment and Michael asked for a reading on this.

You’ll find details at this website: http://newamericanuniversity.asu.edu/

The point is not to blindly apply what Michael Crow did at ASU to UCD.  Still, ASU has made structural steps in attempting to achieve at least some of our goals that we wrote down in the last meeting including cross-disciplinary education and research, national/international recognition of research and teaching, and problem-oriented research.   Some sort of adaptation of ASU to UCD seems applicable if this committee were to consider making recommendations for  major structural changes.

Cheers,

Chris

INFORMATION AND LINK TO A2RU SITE

For the meeting on Wednesday, here is the link to the A2RU site:

http://a2ru.org

The Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) is a partnership of over thirty institutions committed to transforming research universities in order to ensure the greatest possible institutional support for interdisciplinary research, curricula, programs and creative practice between the arts, sciences and other disciplines.

THREE POSSIBLE MODELS FOR FOSTERING CROSS CAMPUS COLLABORATION (research or otherwise)

For full report see: (http://toolkit.creativecampus.org/animating-the-creative-campus-education-and-engagement-for-the-21st-century/)

  1. High impact centrality
    One powerful form of collaboration involves what might be termed the “hub and spokes” approach, where arts-based programming is focused on a common theme and coordinated by a central entity with activities unfolding across campus with diverse partners. The Carpenter Center for Performing Arts at California State University Long Beach used this model when bringing musicians, performance artists, journalists, choreographers, authors, critics, filmmakers, and attorneys to campus to engage students and the community in debates about works of art and expression that have been banned, blacklisted or boycotted. The B-Word Project embedded artistic presentations from dance, theater, music, film, murals in history, philosophy, human development and English classes; it involved the Center for First Amendment Studies and the University Art Museum as well as multiple student groups on campus; and it took place in improvised public spaces. By the end of the initiative, virtually every member of the university community knew about the B-Word Project. The thousands who participated reported high levels of engagement and learning, and the interdisciplinary steering committee for the project became a permanent committee with the mandate of matching faculty and departments with touring artists scheduled to appear each year as part of the performing arts season. The B-Word Project is an example of a “high impact” collaboration. With relatively modest additional resources, the university organized a season of guest artists and lectures and connected them with dozens of departments and organizations to create a powerful, 18-month happening around an important contemporary issue.

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UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA CREATIVE CAMPUS

INTERESTING CENTER AT UA WORKING WITH STUDENTS TO CONNECT TO THE COMMUNITY.  (http://creativecampus.ua.edu/about-us/)

Misson

Creative Campus is dedicated to building a collaborative environment where students can connect with each other, faculty, and their community in turning innovative ideas into action.

Vision

In support of The University and its dedication to excellence in teaching, research, and service, Creative Campus is structured on the following visions:

  • To provide a student internship experience that enhances curriculum, leadership, and creative thinking, allowing students to become the best possible individuals
  • To develop in students an innovative way of approaching the areas of art, education, economy, and leadership
  • To foster creative student-led activities, programs and events that better UA and the Tuscaloosa Community
  • To give the opportunity to all students to be a part of a nurturing environment open for cultural exchange across academic departments and colleges
  • To serve UA and the Community, by providing recognition and celebration of both cultural arts and creative innovations
  • To assist UA in the recruiting of the best and brightest students, faculty and staff

ICAT: INSTITUTE FOR CREATIVITY, ARTS, AND TECHNOLOGY/VIRGINIA TECH

ICAT’s Vision, Mission and Process:

Vision

http://www.icat.vt.edu/about

ICAT will foster the creative process, from imagination to innovation, to create new possibilities for exploration and expression.

Mission

ICAT will forge a pathway between transdisciplinary research and artistic output, scientific and commercial discovery, and educational innovation.

Process

The ongoing work of building and sustaining the institute itself will be an exemplar of the creative process of inclusion, co-creation, innovation, critical reflection, refinement, and iteration.